Russia Reduces German Gas Supply Further

With Gazprom 1 having announced another reduction in the Nord Stream 1 pipeline’s output to around twenty percent of its capacity, Germany and other Central European nations could be faced with having to make some unpalatable choices in the weeks to come. Service resumed on the pipeline last week following a ten-day maintenance period at roughly 40 percent capacity. Now that has been halved and the prospect of even deeper reductions is looming. Other nations in Central Europe are contending with reductions as well. Italy has been informed by Gazprom that the amount of gas it normally receives is being reduced as well. The Russian energy giant claims overall gas flow in the pipeline is lower because of technical concerns with one of the turbine engines. Germany claims this reason is a ‘made up pretext’ and the move is nothing less than a Russian powerplay.

Earlier in the week EU energy ministers announced support for a voluntary 15% reduction in natural gas usage. The plan has been somewhat watered-down following resistance from Southern European nations, but the 27 member-states have agreed to cut back on usage by the winter. The plan is an effort to make certain fuel supplies are adequate for the coming winter. Despite the claim by Brussels that the bloc is united in standing up to Russian energy strongarm tactics, objections by nations not reliant on Russian gas raise the prospect of a disunited front in the future.

In a somewhat ironic reversal of fortunes from ten years ago, now it is Southern European nations like Spain and Portugal chiding Germany for its failure to prepare and short-sighted thinking. They’re not wrong. Berlin ignored the warnings for quite some time as it became dependent on Russian gas. Therefore, the argument put forward by Madrid and Lisbon is that the Germans should carry the largest burden instead of nations whose economies are not reliant on Russian gas.

Gazprom’s Force Majeure Claim Rattles Nerves in Germany

Yesterday’s declaration by state-owned Russian energy giant Gazprom that ‘unforeseeable circumstances’ could make it unable comply with European gas contracts is placing Germany in an even more precarious position. The prospect of Russia shutting down the flow of natural gas to Germany seems more probable. With Gazprom threatening to send less gas to Germany and other European nations, German firm Uniper, a major energy importer, has rejected the claim. According to a company spokesperson, Uniper rejects the force majeure claim put forward by Gazprom. Realistically, Uniper’s rejection does not change matters one way or another.

The Nord Stream 1 pipeline is scheduled to come off its 10-day maintenance period and resume operations on Thursday. It’s unclear if the pipeline will start operating at a reduced capacity, or at all. Despite Berlin claiming to have reduced its overall dependence on Russian gas from 55% to 35% it is still highly dependent on Nord Stream 1. The two other pipelines providing natural gas to Germany from Russia were closed off.

Many analysts still seem to agree that Nord Stream 1 will resume operations, albeit in a limited capacity, perhaps. However, Germany’s nightmare scenario of Putin halting gas deliveries entirely is haunting Berlin and Brussels. The nation is already falling behind efforts to top off its natural gas storage supplies before winter sets in. We discussed this in an earlier entry last week. Gas rationing and other conservation steps will have a detrimental effect on the German economy.  A number of companies are concerned such measures will force them to close permanently.

Germany is not the only target either. A dozen EU nations have seen their gas supplies from Russia either severely reduced or cut off entirely. The lack of a European-based energy sharing plan and the shortsighted thinking of EU leaders on the energy-security front are now coming home to roost.

Germany Is Concerned That Nord Stream 1 Might Be Shut Down Entirely Following Maintenance Period

Europe is on edge as the Nord Stream 1 undersea natural gas pipeline running from Russia to Germany has gone offline for a 10-day maintenance period. Although European efforts to wean the continent off Russian fuel and energy continue, a large portion of Central Europe remains reliant upon Nord Stream 1. Austria, Italy and the Czech Republic receive gas by way of Nord Stream 1, and despite the European sanctions now in place against Moscow, Germany continues to obtain 30% of its natural gas from Russia. Until Germany and other European nations can remove the albatross from around their collective neck that is the dependence on Russian energy, Russia can use this to its advantage. In fact, it already is. Last month Gazprom reduced the westward flow of gas by 60%. The move sent energy prices surging and forced Germany to initiate the second stage of its emergency gas plan.

Naturally, German officials are becoming concerned Russia might use this pre-scheduled maintenance period to shut down the pipeline completely. Germany has been moving to fill its gas storage reserves by November to increase supplies for the winter. If Russia halts the gas flow entirely, a recession will become inevitable. This means the gas crisis Germany has been working hard to avoid will become a reality by the end of the year.  Think tanks in Europe have become serious lately, analyzing the data, modeling the situation, and drawing conclusions on the matter. Some conclusions are more realistic than others, at least in my opinion. But a consensus has emerged that for Germany to weather the coming winter with only non-Russian gas supplies, consumption will need to be significantly lower than it has been in recent years.

The German and Russian governments both realize this as well.