The New Realities Of A MultiPolar World

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is widely recognized as being an event that heralds the formal transition to a multipolar era. Even though ‘Great Powers Competition’ has become the preferred term of pundits and social media geopolitical ‘experts,’ I prefer Multipolar World since it more accurately describes the global landscape at present. For better or worse, power in the world is distributed amongst a small collection of nation-states and alliances spanning multiple continents. As we are witnessing in Ukraine with regards to Russia, the interdependence of the multipolar world becomes imperiled when a powerful nation-state or alliance places its own interests above those of the herd, so to speak.

For the United States and many of her allies in Europe and the Pacific, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has proven the opening phase of this Multipolar World era will be chaotic and without the reins of international oversight and rules-based order in existence since the end of World War II. In other words, despite the wishes of policymakers in Washington, London, Berlin and Tokyo, the present international system could find itself either in need of major remodeling or complete replacement. Russia’s challenge will help to determine not only the future of Ukraine as a nation-state, but also the future of the current international order.

Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine has also reopened the debate on America’s place and role in the world. US actions and positions have consequences, there is no getting around that. Right now, the extent of those actions since the end of the Cold War are coming into focus as scholars and others in the field consider if Russia’s invasion was no more than an inevitable reaction to the US expanding its hegemony in Eastern Europe and beyond after the Cold War concluded. The US continues to play the principal role on the global stage, despite the desires of many Americans to step back from Europe and the Middle East and concentrate on Asia and the Pacific, where the most significant threat to US interests is at.

For the supporters of that line of thinking, Ukraine serves as a very rude wakeup call, proving that despite US desires and wishes, the world may not be ready to see the US shirk its responsibility or embark upon an entirely new endeavor.

The Post-COVID World

 

With the COVID-19 pandemic waning in most areas of the world, the time to begin seriously pondering what the post-COVID world will look like is almost upon us. To be fair, there has been a healthy amount of speculation about that topic since the beginning of the pandemic. However, between then and the present day, new economic, military, diplomatic and geopolitical realities have emerged and obscured the global picture in a myriad of ways.

There will be new realities to contend with. Some nations will refuse or fail to live up to this and inevitably their power and influence will retrograde. Others will recognize the new dynamic in play and attempt to turn it to their advantage. Both of these groups will be made up mainly of middle powers, with a handful of notable Great powers in decline tossed in. One tier above this coming fray will be the remaining Great Powers jockeying for position and searching for ways to extend their influence and power around the world. The obstacle facing some of these powers is their obstinance. Specifically, their tendencies to resort to reflexive, short-term policies and solutions to long term matters. The failure to reengineer their thinking and equip properly for the coming era, which has the potential to be an era defined by unpredictability and sudden shifts in the balance of power.

Finally, at the top stands the United States and China. The two Superpowers are primed to set the tone into the first years of the Post-COVID era. Both have the power and potential to shape the world through their policies and actions, as will the direction and tone of  Sino-US relations.

Throughout the summer, the potential look of the Post-COVID world will be examined and discussed at length.

Author’s Note: Holiday weekend is wrapped up, so I’m starting off slow with a short post today and will get up to speed again by the end of the week.

The Coming Shape of US-China Relations?

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Relations between the United States and China were trending downward even before the COVID-19 pandemic appeared on the horizon. The Trump administration’s China policies have been a far cry from those of preceding administrations, and these policies have played a prime role in creating the toxic atmosphere between the US and China. Now, I am not a China apologist or anti-Trump pundit by any stretch of the imagination. Quite the opposite in fact. So when I say that the current administration’s policies have helped bring about the rift in relations, I am not assessing blame. Again, quite the opposite. 😊

From the start of President Trump’s first term he has played hardball with China on practically everything from trade disparities, to geopolitical matters. The Trump administration’s approach to China is a striking contrast from previous administrations. Whereas the Obama and Bush administrations chose to handle China with kid’s gloves, the Trump administration has come out armed with brass knuckles and swinging. Washington’s primary objective has been reestablishing strategic and economic parity between the US and China.

The hardline US stance shook Beijing, and the Chinese government has been on the defensive practically since January, 2017. In many regards it has been trying to play catch up to the Trump administration in the geopolitical, and economic arenas but without much success. To complicate matters even more, China has been contending with alarming domestic issues even before COVID-19 came into existence. Economic growth was coming to a halt for the first time in decades. This has been exacerbated by the global pandemic, and now it appears the Chinese economy will almost certainly shrink for the first time in decades. Hong Kong erupted in protests last June over an extradition bill allowing the transfer of fugitives to mainland China. Months of protests and violence followed, transitioning to pure political upheaval for a period of time. The pandemic has brought an end to the protesting, but it is temporary. When the world returns to normal the protests will resume again. China has yet to figure out an effective solution to the Hong Kong matter.

The global pandemic has also contributed to the emerging new dynamic in US-China relations. Washington has challenged China’s handling of the initial outbreak, accused it of undermining the World Health Organization, and questioned the numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths released by China. Beijing’s response has been a mishmash of propaganda, thinly veiled threats, and attempts to distract world attention from the case Washington is trying to make. When the world emerges from the global pandemic, US-China relations are going to be centerstage. For better or worse, the new form of the relationship is presently being shaped by current events. If the US-Chinese dialogue in recent weeks is a sign of what’s to come, relations could be looking at a deep freeze in the not-to-distant future.